Tag: Computer Stuff

IIS7: What a change

In the next few weeks, I am required to use one of my most scariest server products I have used. IIS. I use to manage a small network that used IIS for hosting internal mail interface and other web based products our company used. Back then, we were running IIS6 on Server 2003 R2, and what a scary machine that was. IIS6 wasn’t very intuitive compared to other Microsoft server products at that time. When you needed to add a site or add a CGI extension, it always felt you had to hack it to get something to work and you never went back to it after it was working.

I was required to install it for a programming class and what a change. For someone that never had proper training on IIS, the new interface has defiantly been improved and is now very intuitive.

To install IIS7 was open Control Panel -> Programs and Features -> “Turn Windows feature on or off”. I checked the “Internet Information Service” in the list and that was it. Windows installed the service without needing the disks.

It was that easy to get the new web server up and running on my local development machine.

IIS7 Main screen
Browsed to http://localhost to make sure my new IIS server was running.

I remember spending hours in the server room trying to get PHP installed on the old IIS6 machine we were running. I thought, I wonder how easy it will be on IIS7? Turns out very easy! Microsoft now has an installation you can download that installs PHP 5.3.13 into your IIS.

A few things need to be done first. Make sure you have installed CGI. Windows does not do this by default.

CGI Installation
Be sure “CGI” is checked.

IIS is now ready for the PHP installation. Go to php.iis.net to download the executable. Once you have it download, run it and follow the on screen instruction.

That is it! You have now installed PHP on your IIS server. Create a phpinfo() file on the root of your web-server to make sure everything is working.

My phpinfo().

If you run into the error “Handler “PHP53_via_FastCGI” has a bad module “FastCgiModule” in its module list” it means CGI is not installed. Go back into Windows Features and check “CGI”.

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Linux Mounting Partitions

Most Linux distribution include auto mounting for different file system types. Specific distributions, you need to mound some file systems your self. The following commands will allow you to mount different file system types.

To list all partitions attached to the system, use the following commands.

fdisk -l

First thing, create a mount point for this new file system.

mkdir /media/drive

You can create this folder anywhere on the system. Most distributions mount all drives to /media.

Mounting FAT or FAT32:

mount -t vfat /dev/sdb1 /media/drive/

Mounting NTFS:

mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /media/drive/

Un-mounting the drive:

umount /media/drive/
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Mounting Windows Share using smbfs in Kubuntu

On my new Kubuntu box, I wanted to mount my “My Documents” folder that resides on a Windows Server 2003 R2 box. I have always had problems mounting folders due to the nature of Active Directory.

In KDE you can easily mount a share using the built in wizard, but I wanted to mount it as folder so I could access it using command line. First thing to do is install smbfs.

sudo aptitude install smbfs

Next thing we want to do here is make a folder to mount this remote location. I’m going to make it in the /media folder.

sudo mkdir "/media/My Documents"

The quotes are there to allow spaces in the directory name.

After that is this interesting line. If the share your connecting to  has any spaces in the name, you will need to put that option in quotes. Here is my complete line.

sudo mount -t smbfs -o username=blake,password=PASSWORDHERE "//server/UserData/blake/My Documents" "/media/My Documents"

I have made this into a script so I can easily run it when I need to connect.

I hope this has helped you getting your Linux box talking to your Active Directory protected share.

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I died… Okay maybe not.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Im sure a lot of you have wondered what happened to me. Well there is one simple answer, school. Unfortunately any spare time I have is spent doing projects and working on homework. If you want to keep track of my doings, I am on Twitter which is on the left side of my blog or you can hit follow on my profile.

Christmas this year was fantastic. You can see all of the pictures that were taken from my family get together on Facebook. After all the probelm with my desktop computer I have finaly figured out how to get it running stable. Turns out all along it was a issue with the OCZ ram. New ram for Christmas and BAM, away she goes. Second gift I recived was a new monitor. It’s nothing fancy, Samsung 21′ widescreen display to replace my 21″ CRT monitor that has seen better days.

Other then that, that was my Christmas. Like I said, the best way to keep track of me is through Twitter and if you need to contact me best way would be by e-mail here. I will be posting another tutorial soon using the old PS2 Head set into a Guitar Pre-Amp and the mic input on World of Warcraft.


Linux vs Windows

As most of you know I am fluent in both Windows and Linux. Yesterday in the #mybb IRC channel, tension was tight between us Linux people and the Windows fan boy Matt (owner of msubuntu who will be sued when the site is launched) A good friend of myn, DrPoodle had had it with Matt. So with the help of MiNT we started to produce a list of all the reasons why Linux was better then windows. For any of you Windows fan boys… eat this…

1) Linux is free.
2) Linux is faster (another IRC user, tmhai, was astounded earlier today at how his laptop booted in under 30 seconds with Ubuntu, compared to the 30 minutes it took Windows to boot on it).
3) Linux is Open Source (which means bugs and security holes are found and fixed quicker).
4) With Linux, you own your Operating System. With Microsoft Windows, you dont actually own the Operating System, you simply have a license that says you can use it. Every installation of Windows is owned by Microsoft.
5) Linux has better support. This is debatable, but there are a lot of community forums out there, and usually errors in Linux are much more readable than Windows errors, which leads to quicker solutions.
6) Linux has package managers. Most distros come with some form of package manager, a utility that installs safe and secure programs, and then updates them automatically.
7) Linux has daily updates. Most distros release daily updates of core files, as well as updates for programs.
8) Linux has releases every 6 months. Most distros release their next version every 6 months without fail. So instead of waiting an uncertain amount of time for the next Windows release, you know exactly when the next version of your OS will be out.
.. To read all the reasons, click Here.

If any of you Windows people have anything that could possibly have a case against Linux. I ask you to sign up on my forums and post your reasoning.

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